Tag Archives: padres

Padres’ Chacín takes no-hitter into the 6th

The San Diego Padres’ Jhoulys Chacín took a no-hitter into the sixth inning on Saturday night before DJ LeMaheiu singled with two out, extending the club’s streak of no no-hitters to 7,807 regular season games (and 34 post-season contests).

LeMaheiu lined a ball to center field just out of the reach of a diving Manuel Margot, Margot trapped the ball to hold LeMaheiu to a single. It was the only hit yielded by Chacín during his six innings of work, as the Padres topped the Colorado Rockies 5-0.

The Padres are the only major league franchise to have never thrown a no-hitter, a streak in its 48th year.

Cubs’ Pappas no-hits Padres, 45 years ago yesterday

Milt Pappas
Milt Pappas
Forty-five years ago yesterday, on Sept. 2, 1972, the Chicago Cubs’ Milt Pappas no-hit the San Diego Padres at Wrigley Field, becoming the only pitcher in MLB history to lose a perfect game by walking the 27th batter but still get a no-hitter (two others did it on hit batsmen).

Pappas retired the first 26 Padres he faced and was one out away from a perfect game with a 3-2 count on pinch-hitter Larry Stahl when home plate umpire Bruce Froemming called a ball to issue the base on balls. Pappas started yelling at Froemming and nearly got kicked out of the game.

“I’ve got a call, and I’m not a fan. I’m an umpire,” Froemming told the MLB Network’s Bob Costas.

Pappas managed to get pinch-hitter Garry Jestadt to pop out to second to complete the no-no, an 8-0 victory.

A few of years ago I interviewed Pappas, who passed away in April 2016, and he was still upset with umpire Bruce Froemming for not giving him calls on the final batter to give him the perfecto. Pappas told me that people still came up to him to talk about that game.

“I’m still being recognized and still going out and signing autographs, and I’m wondering to myself on numerous occasions, ‘If I would have done the perfect game, would I be getting this kind of adulation?” he asked. “I wouldn’t have had the 40 years of ‘Man, you got screwed’ and ‘Who’s that umpire that called that?’”

Niekro no-hits Padres, 44 years ago today

Phil Niekro
Phil Niekro
Knuckleballer Phil Niekro threw the Braves’ first no-hitter after the club’s move to Atlanta, 44 years ago today.

Sticking with his trademark knuckler from the seventh inning on, Niekro no-hit the San Diego Padres for a 9-0 win at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium on Sunday, August 5, 1973. Niekro had been mixing in fastballs and sliders in the earlier innings.

Five Padres reached base during the game, three on walks and two on errors.

Padres flirt with exiting no no-no club, 1 year ago today

Edwin Jackson nearly made San Diego Padres history in his first start for the club, one year ago today.

Jackson, who threw a no-hitter for the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2010, took a no-no against the San Francisco Giants into the seventh inning on July 17, 2016, before losing it on a Conor Gillaspie three-run homer. Jackson walked five batters in the contest before serving up the dinger.

Six years earlier, the German-born journeyman pitcher needed 149 pitches to no-hit the Tampa Bay Rays for a 1-0 victory at Tropicana Field. The 26-year-old right-hander told Diamondbacks manager A.J. Hinch that it would take a hit to get him off the mound, and he completed the no-no by retiring Jason Bartlett on a groundout on pitch No. 149. We added him to our No-hitters … before they were Padres page.

Jackson’s effort marked the Padres deepest no-hit effort since May 5, 2016, when Colin Rea went 6⅔ innings against the New York Mets. That bid was ended by Yoenis Céspedes, who singled during a shift to the exact spot where the second baseman is normally stationed with two outs in the 7th inning.

Lincecum tosses 2nd no-no vs. Padres, 3 years ago today

The San Francisco Giants’ Tim Lincecum no-hit the San Diego Padres for the second time in less than a year, two years ago today.

Lincecum allowed just one baserunner, walking Chase Headley in the second. He retired the next 23 batters to complete the task at AT&T Park with a 4-0 victory. The only other major league pitcher to throw no-hitters against the same team is the Cleveland Naps’ Addie Joss, who tossed no-nos against the Chicago White Sox on Oct. 2, 1908 and April 20, 1910.

On July 13, 2013, Lincecum struck out 13 Padres hitters at Petco Park but needed a 148th pitch to get Yonder Alonso to fly out to left and complete the 9-0 no-hitter.

Cleveland Naps pitcher Addie Joss, Bain News Service, 1910, LC-DIG-ggbain-08196.
Addie Joss
His no-no pitch count is just one shy of the record since Major League Baseball began tracking such things in 1988. Third-baseman Pablo Sandoval contributed to the effort with a seventh-inning backhand grab on a sharp grounder and Hunter Pence helped with a diving eighth-inning catch.

Lincecum’s 2013 no-hitter was Petco Park’s first.

Meanwhile, the Padres remain the only major league team with no no-no, 7,727 games and counting.

Ellis, on LSD, no-hits Padres, 47 years ago today

Dock Ellis (National Baseball Hall of Fame)
Dock Ellis (National Baseball Hall of Fame)
Pittsburgh Pirates hurler Dock Ellis thought June 12, 1970 was an off-day, so after a long night of partying he woke up and decided to take some LSD. What he didn’t know was he had slept through a full day and he was actually scheduled to pitch Game 1 of a doubleheader against the San Diego Padres.

But Ellis was able to not only secure a 2-0 Pirates win in San Diego, he held the Padres hitless in what is believed to be the only Major League no-hitter thrown by a man tripping on acid.

The story was long thought to be an urban legend, but Ellis talked openly about the experience in a 2005 Dallas Observer story. Ellis, who died in 2008, had long been drug free and was working as a drug counselor when he was interviewed for the article.

“What’s weird is that sometimes it felt like a balloon. Sometimes it felt like a golf ball,” the alternative weekly reported. “But he could always get it to the plate. Getting it over the plate was another matter entirely. Sometimes he couldn’t see the hitter. Sometimes he couldn’t see the catcher.”

That’s evident in the box score, as Ellis apparently walked eight and hit at least one batter.

You can also read about Ellis acid-washed no-no in Baseball’s No-Hit Wonders.

Happy birthday to 4 no-no throwers, Blackwell, Bunning, Leiter and Smith

Four no-hitter throwers were born on this date: Ewell Blackwell, Jim Bunning, Al Leiter and Bud Smith.

Blackwell, born on this date in 1922, threw a no-no for the Cincinnati Reds on Wednesday, June 18, 1947, against the Boston Braves. In his following start, Blackwell just missed duplicating teammate Johnny Vander Meer’s mark of two straight no-nos, losing his second no-no after 8 1/3 innings against Brooklyn.

Bunning, who turns 85 today, threw a no-hitter for the Detroit Tigers against the Boston Red Sox during the first game of a Sunday doubleheader on July 20, 1958. Bunning followed up that gem six years later as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies, throwing a perfect game against the New York Mets at Shea Stadium during the first game of a Father’s Day doubleheader on Sunday, June 21, 1964. Bunning was the first major-league pitcher to throw no-nos in both the AL and NL.

Leiter, celebrating his 51st birthday today, tossed the Florida (now Miami) Marlins’ first no-hitter in franchise history. He blanked the Colorado Rockies on Saturday, May 11, 1996, for an 11-0 win at Joe Robbie Stadium.

Bud Smith, who turns 37 today, threw a no-hitter as a St. Louis Cardinals rookie on Monday, September 3, 2001, shutting down the San Diego Padres for a 4-0 win at Qualcomm Stadium.

Dave Roberts: A modern-day Preston Gomez

Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts is quickly becoming a modern-day Preston Gomez.

Roberts pulled Rich Hill after Hill threw seven innings of perfect baseball Saturday, and the bullpen couldn’t complete what could have been the majors’ first combined perfecto as the Dodgers topped the Marlins in Miami 5-0.

Outfielder Yasiel Puig had just saved Hill’s perfect game in the seventh with a spectacular diving catch, and it was beginning to look like Hill might be poised to throw baseball’s 24th perfecto/296th no-hitter.

But Manager Dave Roberts decided to pull Hill after 89 pitches, opting for reliever Joe Blanton, and Hill clearly wasn’t happy. Blanton retired the first two batters before the pesky Jeff Francoeur drilled a 2-2 pitch off the glove of shortstop Corey Seager. It (weak argument here) could have been ruled an error, which would have killed the combined perfecto but kept the combined no-no intact, but it was properly ruled a base hit.

(Note that Rich Hill threw 5 2/3 innings of no-hit ball back on Sept. 3.)

The situation prompted flashbacks to April 9, when the Dodgers’ Ross Stripling tossed 7⅓ innings of no-hit ball in his first major-league appearance before being pulled for a reliever who lost the no-no. When Stripling hit 100 pitches, Roberts took the ball and handed it to Chris Hatcher, who yielded a two-run homer to Trevor Brown to kill the chance of a combined no-hitter and even the score at 2-2. The Giants wound up winning that game in the bottom of the 10th on a walk-off homer by Brandon Crawford.

Preston Gomez, of course, is known for twice pulling pitchers with no-hitters intact in which they were trailing in the runs column, once with the Padres’ Clay Kirby in 1970 and another with the Astros’ Don Wilson in 1974.

On a personal note, I was watching the MLB.tv broadcast of the game’s late innings on my cell phone while sitting at U.S. Cellular Field. (Fans around me were wondering why I kept looking down at my phone when the Sox had the bases loaded.)

Cards’ rookie Smith no-hits Padres, 15 years ago today

Bud Smith 2001 Topps Traded cardSt. Louis Cardinals rookie Bud Smith no-hit the San Diego Padres, 15 years ago today.

Smith, appearing in just his 13th major league game on Monday, September 3, 2001, struck out seven and walked four while holding the Padres hitless at Qualcomm Stadium en route to a 4-0 win. Smith threw 134 pitches during the game, and his Cardinals career wound up being short, and he pitched his last major league ballgame in July 2002.

Also throwing a no-hitter on this date is the Philadelphia Athletics’ Bill McCahan. At Philadelphia’s Shibe Park on Wednesday, September 3, 1947, McCahan no-hit the Washington Senators for 3-0 win.